Underwater tunnel construction pdf

This article is about underground passages. The definition of what constitutes a tunnel can vary widely from source to source. A longer underpass containing a road, canal or railway is normally called a “underwater tunnel construction pdf”, whether or not it passes under another item of infrastructure. An underpass of any length under a river is also usually called a “tunnel”, whatever mode of transport it is for.

An informed choice can then be made of machinery and methods for excavation and ground support, which will reduce the risk of encountering unforeseen ground conditions. In planning the route, the horizontal and vertical alignments can be selected to make use of the best ground and water conditions. It is common practice to locate a tunnel deeper than otherwise would be required, in order to excavate through solid rock or other material that is easier to support during construction. Conventional desk and preliminary site studies may yield insufficient information to assess such factors as the blocky nature of rocks, the exact location of fault zones, or the stand-up times of softer ground.

This may be a particular concern in large-diameter tunnels. This smaller tunnel is less likely to collapse catastrophically should unexpected conditions be met, and it can be incorporated into the final tunnel or used as a backup or emergency escape passage. Alternatively, horizontal boreholes may sometimes be drilled ahead of the advancing tunnel face. Stand-up time” is the amount of time a newly excavated cavity can support itself without any added structures.

Knowing this parameter allows the engineers to determine how far an excavation can proceed before support is needed, which in turn affects the speed, efficiency, and cost of construction. Generally, certain configurations of rock and clay will have the greatest stand-up time, while sand and fine soils will have a much lower stand-up time. Water leaking into a tunnel or vertical shaft will greatly decrease stand-up time, causing the excavation to become unstable and risking collapse. The most common way to control groundwater is to install dewatering pipes into the ground and to simply pump the water out. This freezes the ground around each pipe until the whole space is surrounded with frozen soil, keeping water out until a permanent structure can be built. If a tunnel excavation is wider than it is high, it will have a harder time supporting itself, decreasing its stand-up time.