Pitot tube experiment pdf

The first known description of an anemometer was given by Leon Battista Alberti in 1450. The anemometer has changed little since its development in the 15th century. Brevoort and Joiner in 1935. A pitot tube experiment pdf type of anemometer was invented in 1845 by Dr.

The air flow past the cups in any horizontal direction turned the shaft at a rate that was proportional to the wind speed. Therefore, counting the turns of the shaft over a set time period produced a value proportional to the average wind speed for a wide range of speeds. On an anemometer with four cups, it is easy to see that since the cups are arranged symmetrically on the end of the arms, the wind always has the hollow of one cup presented to it and is blowing on the back of the cup on the opposite end of the cross. When Robinson first designed his anemometer, he asserted that the cups moved one-third of the speed of the wind, unaffected by the cup size or arm length. This was apparently confirmed by some early independent experiments, but it was incorrect.

Instead, the ratio of the speed of the wind and that of the cups, the anemometer factor, depends on the dimensions of the cups and arms, and may have a value between two and a little over three. Every previous experiment involving an anemometer had to be repeated. The three-cup anemometer also had a more constant torque and responded more quickly to gusts than the four-cup anemometer. The three-cup anemometer was further modified by the Australian Dr Derek Weston in 1991 to measure both wind direction and wind speed. Weston added a tag to one cup, which causes the cupwheel speed to increase and decrease as the tag moves alternately with and against the wind. Wind direction is calculated from these cyclical changes in cupwheel speed, while wind speed is determined from the average cupwheel speed. Unlike the Robinson anemometer, whose axis of rotation is vertical, the vane anemometer must have its axis parallel to the direction of the wind and therefore horizontal.

The speed of the fan is measured by a rev counter and converted to a windspeed by an electronic chip. Hence, volumetric flowrate may be calculated if the cross-sectional area is known. In cases where the direction of the air motion is always the same, as in ventilating shafts of mines and buildings, wind vanes known as air meters are employed, and give satisfactory results. Air flowing past the wire cools the wire. Hot-wire anemometers, while extremely delicate, have extremely high frequency-response and fine spatial resolution compared to other measurement methods, and as such are almost universally employed for the detailed study of turbulent flows, or any flow in which rapid velocity fluctuations are of interest. The strings contain fine wires, but encasing the wires makes them much more durable and capable of accurately measuring air, gas, and emissions flow in pipes, ducts, and stacks.